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Old 6th April 2015, 04:20 AM   #1
parmeshwarthave
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Please tell me about Pagination in SEO.

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Old 6th April 2015, 01:01 PM   #2
torka
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Well, to start with, pagination is not specifically an SEO tactic, but rather a web content organization tactic. Using pagination, an otherwise overwhelming amount of content is split into multiple pages.

This doesn't result in better content (or even more content), it just means that the content is (potentially) arranged in more "bite-sized" chunks that might be easier for visitors to deal with.

An example would be how this forum divides up posts. We don't show all the thousands of forum posts in any category on a single page; instead, each category shows a certain number of posts per page, with the ability to move between pages to find the post you're looking for.

Similarly, once you're reading a thread, you will discover that the thread responses don't all appear on a single page. Once there is a certain number (I think it's 10, but don't quote me on that), the next response appears on a second page. Once that second page is "full," the next response will appear on a third page and so on and so forth.

The same thing can happen with an article. Sometimes you'll start reading a long article online, and when you get to the bottom of the page, you'll see links for a second page (and maybe third, fourth, fifth, whatever).

That's pagination.

It doesn't necessarily help much with SEO, because -- as I said -- pagination doesn't make your content any better. It just spreads it out over more pages. If for some reason you think you need more pages that what you have now, pagination will definitely help you create more pages.

But it's hardly a major SEO tactic. It does have the potential to make things a little "friendlier" for your human visitors if it's implemented well. The downside is if it isn't done well, it can make things inconvenient, confusing or just plain annoying for your human visitors (like when someone breaks up an article into multiple pages and doesn't allow any option to view as a single page, for instance... one of my pet peeves).

Because pagination is often implemented poorly, IMO it's probably as likely to hurt as help.

My

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Old 7th April 2015, 08:19 AM   #3
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For SEO I believe one concept behind pagination is to decrease bounce rate. Bounce rate is an SEO factor.

Google tracks clicks in Chrome so consider the outcome from pagination if a user goes from the search results to an article, reads the article, then goes back to the search results to click on a different result.

With a one page article the "clicks" are serp - article - serp. Not necessarily a good number.

On the other hand, with pagination, the "clicks" may look like this for a 3-page article: serp - article 1 - article 2 - article 3 - back to article 2 - back to article 1 - serp. A much different result. It appears the user is more engaged with the website.

In my opinion user engagement is an underestimated SEO factor.

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Old 7th April 2015, 11:24 AM   #4
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Do you have any actual testing-backed evidence or -- preferably -- confirmation from Google that they use bounce rate as an SEO factor? Or is this simply your own speculation (or someone else's speculation that you read somewhere)?

Because simple logic tells me they would not give it much weight, if they even look at it at all.

Think.

First, if a website owner isn't using Google Analytics, Google has no idea what the "bounce rate" is for a given page. Seriously, they do not. They do not have access to the server logs for any site that they don't own, and they have no access to any visitor behavior information for sites that don't run Analytics.

Even if we get paranoid and figure they have some sort of back door in the Chrome browser that would allow them to spy on the sites viewed by those who use it for non-anonymous browsing, Chrome's market share last I checked was less than 25%. Meaning that more than 3/4 of all web browsers are not Chrome.

The folks at Google are smart, but they're not mind-readers. If the site I'm visiting isn't using Analytics, and if I'm part of the 3/4 of the people online who aren't using Chrome, there is no way they have any idea what I'm up to.

And there's no way of determining whether those relatively few Chrome users comprise a statistically valid sample of the whole web browsing population (I'd say there's a better than reasonable chance they do not) so the math whiz kids at Google would certainly know better than to try to extrapolate Chrome data (if it even exists) to the web as a whole.

Therefore, they do not know the "bounce rate" for a significant portion of the web pages and searches that take place. Do you seriously think they'd use bounce rate as a significant ranking factor when there are so many pages, so many searches, for which they do not have any information at all?

Second, they have no way of knowing if someone is using a tabbed browser and continuing to look at the first site while also checking out a second site from the search results to see if it gives a different perspective.

I do this all the time, myself. I'm sure I'm not the only one. I will often have a dozen tabs open at once, several of them representing sites I'm visiting as the result of a single search. It might look as though I'm "pogo sticking" all over the place, when in fact I'm actually simply opening multiple results one after the other so I can review them all at leisure.

And even if I do hop into one site, read one page and leave... that doesn't mean the page was bad. It might mean the page was excellent and answered my question right away.

Remember? That's the kind of thing Google wants. Pages that answer a user's query right away. That's what the whole Knowledge Graph thing is all about.

This is why "user engagement" is a bogus metric when it comes to influencing search results. Sometimes I click further in to a site because it's interesting and I want to read more (a good thing)... and other times I'm clicking further because the page I landed on didn't answer my question, but I'm hoping another nearby page might be closer to what I'm looking for (not such a good result). Sometimes I leave right away (a "bounce") because the page was completely off the mark (a terrible result) and sometimes it's because I found what I was looking for immediately (an excellent result).

Google is not going to "reward" a site simply because people click through to additional pages. They know a "bounce" doesn't necessarily mean a site did a bad job, and that clicking through doesn't mean it's doing a great job.

Now, if you've got some kind of statistically valid testing or confirmation from someone at Google that proves I'm off the mark here, I'd really like to see it. Seriously! I'm the first to admit I don't know everything, and I'm always ready to learn something new.

It's just that based on what I understand right now about Google, statistics and search, the whole "user engagement" and "bounce rate" metrics don't add up as significant search ranking factors.

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Old 8th April 2015, 07:28 AM   #5
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Pagination means putting too much data within single webpage just like rearing its ugly head in contexts ranging from e-commerce, to newspapers. The main purpose of doing this is to get the search engines to crawl the pages and to distribute page rank from highly crawled pages of our website to the deeper pages of our website.

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Old 9th April 2015, 02:08 AM   #6
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Pagination help to divide webpages contents in category wise order lists.

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Old 9th April 2015, 05:13 PM   #7
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Torka, interesting points and unfortunately, since no one has access to Google's ever changing secret algorithms issues are inevitably open for speculation.

The starting point for me is Google tracks clicks links on its own search results.

If you click from the Google serp to site A, click back, then click from the Google serp to site B, then Google has (1) a bounce and (2) a time between clicks.

A former member of Google's search team said Google uses this data for rankings and it would be "silly" for anyone to think otherwise:

http://searchenginewatch.com/sew/new...rganic-results

That article also references bounce rate as being a likely ranking factor.


As stated here in summarizing a panel discussion by former Google search team employees:

"Google definitely uses Chrome user data and can track every click within it."

https://www.siliconbeachtraining.co....e-brighton-seo

That could give Google data about page clicks via Chrome. Even if not personally identifiable the information is useful for rankings.


As far as Chrome's market share, different sources provide different numbers.

Chrome - 50+ percent market share - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_s...f_web_browsers

Chrome - 35% market share to US govt sites - http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-mos...-web-browsers/

But even 25 percent is significant. No reason to discount billions of clicks, literally per day. The fact Google may not have data from someone using IE to visit a site without Google Analytics is irrelevant. Google has enough data on its own. No one needs 100% of all possible data to create a ranking factor. That is the basis of statistical analysis. That is why we get election projections from a poll of 1000 people before 100 million have voted.

One of the earlier articles I mentioned refers to Google admitting to using toolbar data for rankings. The percentage of people using that is far, far, far less than 25 percent.


As for "user engagement" being a "bogus" metric influencing search results, you're going to get a vigorous opposing view here.

From my personal experience IMHO it is a significant factor and growing in importance. With PageRank declining in importance due to backlinks being gamed and so many links being nofollowed, and the on-page relevancy long being the subject of abuse, most of what is left is user engagement factors.

Within user engagement I include click thru rate from the serps to a site, and the other side of the coin is the bounce rate, that is when does someone come back and click on another search result. I have seen pages with zero backlinks rise in the serps from getting nothing other than a high CTR. See also the prior links for ex-Google search team employees saying this is a factor.

Site speed, another user engagement factor, has long been known to be ranking factor:

http://searchengineland.com/google-n...g-factor-39708

In less than two weeks not being mobile responsive is going to clobber many sites in mobile search because Google is so concerned about user engagement.

http://googlewebmastercentral.blogsp...ly-search.html

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