What is the Best Microscope for Kids and Students? 6 Great Options

It’s never too early to pique your children’s’ interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). 

We recommend encouraging your children to explore these academic disciplines. Occupations in the STEM workforce have grown 79% since 1990. Estimates show careers in this field growing by 13% until 2027.  

One way to foster a love of science is by buying them a kid’s microscope. Don’t wait until your little one is in elementary or high school to buy them one. Children of all ages can use microscopes in their daily play.

With so many options on the market, how do you know which will be the best microscope for kids?

Our buying guide will make the process easy for you. Keep reading to find the top options on the market today. 

Best Microscope for Kids: AmScope

The AmScope is an excellent choice for students of all ages. It comes with all the materials and slide preparation tools your little one needs to get started. 

This children’s microscope is a versatile dual-light style. These LED light sources are useful when your little one wants to view both slides or opaque objects.

The AmScope makes looking at tiny specimens like cells a breeze. But they can also use the microscope for larger objects like leaves.  And if your little one wants to look at opaque things like sand, they can, thanks to its top lighting. 

It provides five different magnification settings from 40X to 1000X. 

Pros

Provides a lot of versatility.

Great for beginner and intermediate users.

Provides a lot of value for a small price tag.

Cons

Stage needs to be moved manually. 

Some problems with durability. 

Best Value: National Geographic Dual LED

This unique microscope kit for students should be on the top of their wishlists this year. It’s simple enough to operate, but with the features it needs to be a powerful learning tool. 

This product comes with 50 different accessories, perfect for keeping things interesting. They can use the prepared slides to explore things like pollen germs or fern leaves. The Learning Guide helps teaches them about these included slides and how to use their new tool.

It comes with two different lenses for 20X or 50X magnification. 

For the picky kids in the crowd, this microscope comes in three different color options. 

Pros

Satisfaction guarantee and warranty included.

Comes with 10 prepared slides.

Comes with a brine shrimp experiment. 

Affordable price tag.

Cons

Feels a bit flimsy.

Some concerns about durability.

Best Untethered Microscope: Dino-Lite USB Digital

The Dino-Lite is a unique option for someone looking for a non-traditional microscope. This is a digital and handheld option that you plug into a computer to use. Instead of viewing specimens through an eyepiece, they’ll be on their computer screen. 

This product is compact, which makes it easy to tote around from class to class. It wouldn’t be the best choice for elementary students, but your older kids will love it. 

This high-quality software included provides for unique capabilities not possible with other options. Your students can take pictures of their specimens and share them with friends. They’ll also be able to compare and analyze the images they take. 

Pros

Four LED lights.

Portable design.

Easy to use. 

Magnification to 200X without needing to change a single lens.

Cons

Image quality is not the best.

Software may not work correctly with lower-end microscopes. 

Best High-Tech Microscope: CETI Colt Binocular Compound

If your child is older, Medline Scientific microscopes may be perfect. They have an entire line that will suit all your needs.  

The CETI Colt is a powerful unit that’s great for various educational applications.  It comes in two options, so you can choose how powerful you need your magnification to be. One offers magnification up to 60X and the other up to 100X. 

It comes with one spare bulb and two extra fuses for your convenience. 

Pros

Powerful unit.

Up to 100x magnification.

Quadruple nose piece.

Mechanical stage.

Cons

Only available from the manufacturer.

Best Microscope for Taking Images: Celestron 5MP

The Celestron comes from one of the best names in the business. It’s a handheld and digital microscope with a 5MP sensor for capturing the best images.

You can connect this product right to your computer using a USB cord. You can then view and record images straight from your microscope to your computer. 

Unlike the previous handheld option, the Celestron comes with an adjustable and weighted stand. This allows for a more traditional use of the product if you prefer. The stand also makes for clearer images. 

Pros

Ready to use out of the box.

5MP sensor for capturing high-quality images.

Easy to use software.

One-handed use.

Cons

Not a professional microscope.

Best Microscope for Toddlers: Educational Insights GeoSafari Jr.

So far, we’ve only showcased microscopes for kids in elementary or high schools and beyond. But what about kids interested in science who are much younger? The Educational Insights microscope is made for toddlers and is a great STEM toy. 

Your preschooler will find this microscope easy-to-use thanks to its two large eyepieces. The oversized focusing knob is for hands that don’t quite have full dexterity yet. 

This award-winning beginner microscope has 8X magnification. This makes exploring their favorite rock or toy a breeze.

Pros

Great introduction to STEM.

Easy to push light button. 

Durable construction.

Cons

Requires 3AAA batteries.

Get Your Science On

You can’t go wrong with any of the above products if you’re looking for the best microscope for kids. Each option provides a unique set of pros and cons, but they all come recommended by consumers. 

A great thing about many of these microscopes is that they can be just as easily used by adults. If you’re in the STEM industry and need an entry-level microscope, most of the options here will do. 

Be sure to check out our Small Business Tips for advice on helping your business thrive. 

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